Girl Scout Cookies are Made Differently Across the Country. Which are you eating?

LATimes.com: Girl Scout Cookies You Thought You Were Getting But Aren’t

“When you bite into a Thin Mint, you probably aren’t wondering where it comes from. (The Girl Scouts, of course.) But wait, there are two bakers. And they make two very different Thin Mints: One is crunchier, more minty. The other is richer with a smooth chocolate coating.

Where you buy determines which ones you get. Orange County gets the crunchier Thin Mints, while Los Angeles gets the smoother ones; Dallas gets Samoas, but Fort Worth gets Caramel deLites. Most of Florida eats Tagalongs, but Orlando gets Peanut Butter Patties.

Which cookies are you eating?”

Advertisements

‘Better Call Saul’ is Great, How Long Do TV Spinoffs Usually Last?

FiveThirtyEight.com: How Long Can A Spinoff Like ‘Better Call Saul’ Last?

“The average spinoff lasted 68 episodes, and its parent series ran an average of 171 episodes, meaning that we can expect the average spinoff to run 40 percent of the length of its originator. The spectrum was wide, though. Some shows, like “Beverly Hills Buntz” and “Bewitched” spinoff “Tabitha,” barely lasted 5 percent of their parents’ runs, while others, like “Frasier” and “Golden Girls” offshoot “Empty Nest,” were on 98 percent as long as their predecessors. The rarest category: spinoffs whose runs exceeded those of their originators. Only five shows were in this category — “Family Matters,” “The Jeffersons,” “NCIS,” “Jackass” spinoff “Viva La Bam,” and the little-remembered Western “Wanted: Dead or Alive.” Most shows, though, fell into the comfortable middle of moderate success, their runs lasting between one-third and two-thirds as long as their originating series.

Based on precedent, we can expect a spinoff of “Breaking Bad,” which ran for 62 episodes, to run for about 25 episodes — two seasons, give or take, by cable standards. But “Better Call Saul” is a different, more retro, spinoff, one that maybe shouldn’t be judged the same way as most contemporary spinoffs.”

Elon Musk’s Hyperloop is Actually Getting Built in 2016

hyperloop

WIRED.com: Hyperloop Construction Starts Next Year With the First Full-Scale Track

“The Hyperloop, designed in August 2013 by SpaceX and Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk, is a transportation network of above-ground tubes that would span hundreds of miles. Thanks to extremely low air pressure inside those tubes, capsules filled with people zip through them at near supersonic speeds.

The idea is to build a five-mile track in Quay Valley, a planned community that will be built from scratch on 7,500 acres of land around Interstate 5, midway between San Francisco and Los Angeles.”